Limited Edition Prints

 

The following Photographic Prints  are offered for sale and are taken from the portfolio of work “Disappearing Places”;  each image is professionally printed on Fuji Crystal Archive photographic paper and limited to an Edition of 100.
Prints are presented in archive sleeves for maximum protection and all prints are signed by the photographer and include the edition number.
Print Size 16ins x 12ins – Image Size aprox 14ins x 10ins
Print no’s 1 – 10 to be retained by the artist for Exhibition use.
Profits from the sale of every print  will be donated to the Royal British Legion.
Print Cost £35.00 (inc p&p)
Photographer: Trevor Griffiths

 

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The Grand Hotel – Llandudno North Wales

 

 

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Beaumaris Catalina Flying Boat Factory A small estate called Friars in North Wales was purchased by Saunders-Roe to become a base for the works to modify the newly delivered Catalina aircraft from the USA to the standards required for Coastal Command. An area offshore, to the east of the suspension bridge across Menai Straits, was chosen, as it was able to provide a sheltered deep water-landing zone. Saunders Roe dismantled one of their spare T hangars at Cowes and re-erected it on the site in August 1941. The Ministry of Aircraft Production built a T2 hangar and workshops on the site in December 1941 and linked to the foreshore by a concrete slipway, Friar’s House also became part of the factory complex. The slipways and the hangars that were built are still present but no access is permitted onto the site due to the structural condition and dilapidation of the remaining buildings. Over 300 planes had armament installed, including .303 Browning machine-guns and British type bomb-racks (to carry up to 12,000lbs), plus radio equipment, Air-to-Surface Vessel radar (ASV) and Leigh Lights. The first Catalina arrived in April 1941 and over 300 Catalinas passed through Saunders Roes new facility for conversion throughout the war. Ref: http://www.coflein.gov.uk/en/site/270847/details/beaumaris-flying-boat-station-saunders-roe-factory
1. Catalina Flying Boat Factory – Beaumaris North Wales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Beaumaris Catalina Flying Boat Factory A small estate called Friars in North Wales was purchased by Saunders-Roe to become a base for the works to modify the newly delivered Catalina aircraft from the USA to the standards required for Coastal Command. An area offshore, to the east of the suspension bridge across Menai Straits, was chosen, as it was able to provide a sheltered deep water-landing zone. Saunders Roe dismantled one of their spare T hangars at Cowes and re-erected it on the site in August 1941. The Ministry of Aircraft Production built a T2 hangar and workshops on the site in December 1941 and linked to the foreshore by a concrete slipway, Friar’s House also became part of the factory complex. The slipways and the hangars that were built are still present but no access is permitted onto the site due to the structural condition and dilapidation of the remaining buildings. Over 300 planes had armament installed, including .303 Browning machine-guns and British type bomb-racks (to carry up to 12,000lbs), plus radio equipment, Air-to-Surface Vessel radar (ASV) and Leigh Lights. The first Catalina arrived in April 1941 and over 300 Catalinas passed through Saunders Roes new facility for conversion throughout the war. Ref: http://www.coflein.gov.uk/en/site/270847/details/beaumaris-flying-boat-station-saunders-roe-factory
2. Catalina Flying Boat Factory – Beaumaris North Wales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Skipton on Swale Control Tower

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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he Airfield is located four miles west of Thirsk in North Yorkshire and was one of the closely packed bomber stations in the Vale of York. It was a Royal Air Force air station operated by RAF Bomber Command during World War Two. The site catered for 1,924 males and 166 females when it was opened in August 1942, and became operational in May 1943 Originally RAF Skipton on Swale was intended for No.4 Group but, received No.420 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and its Wellington bombers. These were transferred from No. 1 Group at Weddington in preparation for joining the planned RCAF group. RCAF squadrons stationed here included 424 Squadron, recently returned from North Africa to re-equip with Halifax’s. Officially born at RAF Skipton on Swale, on May Day 1943 No. 432 Squadron started operations with Wellingtons on the night on the 23rd May. Nos. 424 and 433 Squadrons were disbanded in October 1945 and in November 1946 No. 300 Polish Bomber Squadron moved in and disbanded here on 2 January 1947. In the village a Cairn has been erected in memory of the August 1944 crash of a Halifax Bomber Halifax BM-H (MZ828) and reads ON THIS SITE IN AUGUST 1944 A DISABLED ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE HALIFAX III BOMBER CRASHED ON RETURN FROM A BOMBING MISSION. RESULTING IN THE DEATHS OF TWO CREW MEMBERS AND ONE CIVILIAN. THIS CAIRN IN THE SHADE OF A CANADIAN MAPLE TREE IS ERECTED TO HONOUR ALL WHO THOSE WHO SERVED WITH THE RCAF SIX GROUP SQUADRONS AT SKIPTON ON SWALE DURING WWII AND THE MANY CIVILIANS WHO SUPPORTED THEM. MAY THEIR ENTERPRISE, COURAGE AND DEVOTION TO DUTY BE REMEMBERED AND SERVE AS AN INSPIRATION TO ALL. DEDICATED MAY 19, 1984 BY A GROUP INCLUDING GRATEFUL SURVIVORS “THIS WAS THEIR FINEST HOUR” The civilian was Kenneth Battensby a 5-year-old boy who was killed in the plane crash when he was showered with debris from the crash. The Halifax Bomber was returning damaged from a mission overseas. The Halifax III missed the runway and crashed into the bridge. Ops Report Aug 5, 1944 98 bombers were lost in operations flying from Skipton on Swale. Ref http://www.wartimememoriesproject.com/ww2/airfields/airfield.php?pid=1840
1. Former RAF Skipton on Swale Control Tower – North Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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he Airfield is located four miles west of Thirsk in North Yorkshire and was one of the closely packed bomber stations in the Vale of York. It was a Royal Air Force air station operated by RAF Bomber Command during World War Two. The site catered for 1,924 males and 166 females when it was opened in August 1942, and became operational in May 1943 Originally RAF Skipton on Swale was intended for No.4 Group but, received No.420 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and its Wellington bombers. These were transferred from No. 1 Group at Weddington in preparation for joining the planned RCAF group. RCAF squadrons stationed here included 424 Squadron, recently returned from North Africa to re-equip with Halifax’s. Officially born at RAF Skipton on Swale, on May Day 1943 No. 432 Squadron started operations with Wellingtons on the night on the 23rd May. Nos. 424 and 433 Squadrons were disbanded in October 1945 and in November 1946 No. 300 Polish Bomber Squadron moved in and disbanded here on 2 January 1947. In the village a Cairn has been erected in memory of the August 1944 crash of a Halifax Bomber Halifax BM-H (MZ828) and reads ON THIS SITE IN AUGUST 1944 A DISABLED ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE HALIFAX III BOMBER CRASHED ON RETURN FROM A BOMBING MISSION. RESULTING IN THE DEATHS OF TWO CREW MEMBERS AND ONE CIVILIAN. THIS CAIRN IN THE SHADE OF A CANADIAN MAPLE TREE IS ERECTED TO HONOUR ALL WHO THOSE WHO SERVED WITH THE RCAF SIX GROUP SQUADRONS AT SKIPTON ON SWALE DURING WWII AND THE MANY CIVILIANS WHO SUPPORTED THEM. MAY THEIR ENTERPRISE, COURAGE AND DEVOTION TO DUTY BE REMEMBERED AND SERVE AS AN INSPIRATION TO ALL. DEDICATED MAY 19, 1984 BY A GROUP INCLUDING GRATEFUL SURVIVORS “THIS WAS THEIR FINEST HOUR” The civilian was Kenneth Battensby a 5-year-old boy who was killed in the plane crash when he was showered with debris from the crash. The Halifax Bomber was returning damaged from a mission overseas. The Halifax III missed the runway and crashed into the bridge. Ops Report Aug 5, 1944 98 bombers were lost in operations flying from Skipton on Swale. Ref http://www.wartimememoriesproject.com/ww2/airfields/airfield.php?pid=1840
2. Former RAF Skipton on Swale Control Tower and Poultry Farm – North Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The airfield was built as a Class A airfield in the winter of 1941-1942 with a runway that was running parallel to the old London-North Eastern Railway main line (London-Edinburgh), only 300 meters to the east. According to local stories pilots would hope to coincide the timely appearance of an express train from the north with them revving their engines for take-off on runway 19. While the train would overtake at the start of their run, it would be thoroughly outpaced once the aircraft went airborne at the other end of the runway. Such take-offs were usually accompanied by loud blasts on the steam whistle and the waving of arms from the cab and carriage windows. During the 155 raids 578 Sqn mounted from Burn, it had 40 aircraft missing in action. Over the 14 months as an active unit, 578 Sqn earned one Victoria Cross, 143 Distinguished Flying Crosses and 82 Distinguished Flying Medals, in addition to the unit being known for its consistent bombing accuracy. Combined, this resulted in the granting of a squadron crest by His Majesty King George VI in February 1945 with the motto `Accuracy’. Also, the squadron’s ground crews outstanding service on Bristol Hercules XVI engines resulted in an award by the Bristol Aeroplane Company. The award, a shield, is now on display at the Yorkshire Air Museum at Elvington near York. Two of their Halifaxes passed the century mark on operations, flying 104 and 105 operations respectively, but both aircraft survived the war only to be scrapped. In total, 219 airmen flew from RAF Burn and never returned from their mission. Ref: http://www.forgottenairfields.com/united-kingdom/england/north-yorkshire/burn-s976.html
Former RAF Burn Airfield – North Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Acaster Malbis Airfield (RAF Acaster Malbis) Construction of the airfield began in 1941 and it opened in January 1942 as a satellite to RAF Church Fenton. The first unit to arrive was 601Sqn, flying Bell Airacobras. The combination of technical problems and bad weather conditions resulted in many serious accidents. Constant problems with mist and fog, due to the station’s proximity to the river Ouse, combined with low elevation continued to plague the airfield. After the end of the war, RAF Acaster Malbis became home to No 91 MU (Maintenance Unit), responsible for the storage and disposal of vast amounts of surplus ammunition. It closed as a airfield in February 1946, but continued to be used as a storage site. Large stocks of explosives were laid out on the runways, waiting for disposal. The pre-war road across the site was quickly re-opened in 1946. The storage and disposal of vast amounts of ammunition was not complete until well into the 1950s. RAF Acaster Malbis was decommissioned in 1963 and the land sold by public auction. It reverted to farmland, although many of the local people remember learning to drive on the disused runways. Ref : http://www.forgottenairfields.com/united-kingdom/england/york/acaster-malbis-s981.html
Former RAF Acaster Malbis – North Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Former RAF Snaith is located in Yorkshire near the small village of Pollington. The airfield became operational in 1940/41 and was a primarily a bomber base with three concrete runways, three hangers and thirty-six heavy bomber hard standings. At its peak use the station could accommodate 2400 personnel. 150 Squadron were initially based here and flew Wellington bombers on raids over Europe. In 1942, 150 Sqn moved out and were replaced by 51 Squadron who flew Halifax bombers. The Pollington Airfield Memorial Garden, located on the site of the former station headquarters stands as a living memorial to all those who served at RAF Snaith. The inscription on the memorial stone reads. “In memory of the 687 airmen of 51 Squadron, 4 Group, Bomber Command who lost their lives flying Halifax Bombers Marks II and III here at RAF Snaith between October 1942 and April 1945. Also remembering the 205 airmen of 150 Squadron lost on active duty who preceded them at this airfield flying Wellington Bombers Marks I and III”. Ref: www.pollington village.co.uk/this-is-pollington/RAF-memorial.html
Former RAF Snaith – East Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In 1940 a network of defences was hastily built all over the British Isles to prevent an anticipated German invasion. The most common of these defences were called pillboxes, squat concrete forts that were sited at road junctions, canals and other strategic points. With the passage of time it is estimated that less than 6,000 of a total of 28,000 pillboxes built still survive. They remain as permanent monuments and a silent tribute to the courage and tenacity of the British people during the dark days of 1940 when Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany. http://www.pillboxesuk.co.uk
4. Pillbox – Cayton Bay North Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1.  Godwin Battery – Kilnsea East Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sandy Beaches Caravan Park  Godwin Battery – Kilnsea East Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“In 1940 when London was faced with intensive bombing by the Luftwaffe every night, Prime Minister Winston Churchill was very concerned for the safekeeping of Britain’s art treasures and he issued an order for them to be moved from the museums and art galleries in London. They must be taken to a safe place elsewhere in Britain and he was advised to have them sent to Manod Quarry in Blaenau Ffestiniog. The priceless treasures were transported to a mountain which had been specially heated and ventilated to maintain the correct temperature. The secret hiding place was eventually revealed many years after the end of World War II. All the royal pictures from the palaces, from the Tate and the National Gallery were transported to North Wales. Among the treasures were 19 Rembrandts, Van Dykes, Leonardo da Vincis and Gainsboroughs, together with the Crown Jewels. They travelled to North Wales in vehicles disguised as delivery vehicles for a chocolate company and were put in the care of the quarry manager, and were only ever seen by him. It is said that the worry of the responsibility shortened his life. The caves were leased by the Government for 40 years, but when the lease expired in 1981, the Government refused to release the lease. For 40 years two brothers were employed to maintain the ventilation system, even though the works of art were returned to London and the wartime storage place was empty. Behind the large steel and timber doors was a tunnel 1,200 feet long and 1,000 feet below the top of the mountain. The caves themselves that were used for the safe storage are said to have stood over 200 feet high, as high as a cathedral.
1. Manod – Blaenau Ffestiniog Gwynedd North Wales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“In 1940 when London was faced with intensive bombing by the Luftwaffe every night, Prime Minister Winston Churchill was very concerned for the safekeeping of Britain’s art treasures and he issued an order for them to be moved from the museums and art galleries in London. They must be taken to a safe place elsewhere in Britain and he was advised to have them sent to Manod Quarry in Blaenau Ffestiniog. The priceless treasures were transported to a mountain which had been specially heated and ventilated to maintain the correct temperature. The secret hiding place was eventually revealed many years after the end of World War II. All the royal pictures from the palaces, from the Tate and the National Gallery were transported to North Wales. Among the treasures were 19 Rembrandts, Van Dykes, Leonardo da Vincis and Gainsboroughs, together with the Crown Jewels. They travelled to North Wales in vehicles disguised as delivery vehicles for a chocolate company and were put in the care of the quarry manager, and were only ever seen by him. It is said that the worry of the responsibility shortened his life. The caves were leased by the Government for 40 years, but when the lease expired in 1981, the Government refused to release the lease. For 40 years two brothers were employed to maintain the ventilation system, even though the works of art were returned to London and the wartime storage place was empty. Behind the large steel and timber doors was a tunnel 1,200 feet long and 1,000 feet below the top of the mountain. The caves themselves that were used for the safe storage are said to have stood over 200 feet high, as high as a cathedral.
2. New Manod Quarry – Blaenau Ffestiniog  Gwynedd North Wales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“In 1940 when London was faced with intensive bombing by the Luftwaffe every night, Prime Minister Winston Churchill was very concerned for the safekeeping of Britain’s art treasures and he issued an order for them to be moved from the museums and art galleries in London. They must be taken to a safe place elsewhere in Britain and he was advised to have them sent to Manod Quarry in Blaenau Ffestiniog. The priceless treasures were transported to a mountain which had been specially heated and ventilated to maintain the correct temperature. The secret hiding place was eventually revealed many years after the end of World War II. All the royal pictures from the palaces, from the Tate and the National Gallery were transported to North Wales. Among the treasures were 19 Rembrandts, Van Dykes, Leonardo da Vincis and Gainsboroughs, together with the Crown Jewels. They travelled to North Wales in vehicles disguised as delivery vehicles for a chocolate company and were put in the care of the quarry manager, and were only ever seen by him. It is said that the worry of the responsibility shortened his life. The caves were leased by the Government for 40 years, but when the lease expired in 1981, the Government refused to release the lease. For 40 years two brothers were employed to maintain the ventilation system, even though the works of art were returned to London and the wartime storage place was empty. Behind the large steel and timber doors was a tunnel 1,200 feet long and 1,000 feet below the top of the mountain. The caves themselves that were used for the safe storage are said to have stood over 200 feet high, as high as a cathedral.
3. New Manod Quarry – Blaenau Ffestiniog Gwynedd North Wales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“In 1940 when London was faced with intensive bombing by the Luftwaffe every night, Prime Minister Winston Churchill was very concerned for the safekeeping of Britain’s art treasures and he issued an order for them to be moved from the museums and art galleries in London. They must be taken to a safe place elsewhere in Britain and he was advised to have them sent to Manod Quarry in Blaenau Ffestiniog. The priceless treasures were transported to a mountain which had been specially heated and ventilated to maintain the correct temperature. The secret hiding place was eventually revealed many years after the end of World War II. All the royal pictures from the palaces, from the Tate and the National Gallery were transported to North Wales. Among the treasures were 19 Rembrandts, Van Dykes, Leonardo da Vincis and Gainsboroughs, together with the Crown Jewels. They travelled to North Wales in vehicles disguised as delivery vehicles for a chocolate company and were put in the care of the quarry manager, and were only ever seen by him. It is said that the worry of the responsibility shortened his life. The caves were leased by the Government for 40 years, but when the lease expired in 1981, the Government refused to release the lease. For 40 years two brothers were employed to maintain the ventilation system, even though the works of art were returned to London and the wartime storage place was empty. Behind the large steel and timber doors was a tunnel 1,200 feet long and 1,000 feet below the top of the mountain. The caves themselves that were used for the safe storage are said to have stood over 200 feet high, as high as a cathedral.
4. New Manod Quarry – Blaenau Ffestiniog Gwynedd North Wales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Loch Ewe has a side many people are unaware of; this beautiful north-facing loch in Wester Ross was used as a convoy collecting point with a strong naval presence during WW11. Loch Ewe is a natural deep-water sea loch that links to the Atlantic Ocean via a relatively “narrow mouth” which made it easier to protect the loch from enemy submarines. There was one Heavy Anti-Aircraft Battery and one troop from a light Anti-Aircraft Battery stationed at Loch Ewe, about 12 officers and 380 men altogether. It was in February 1941, when the loch became a convoy collecting point, that its presence became permanent. 379 Battery of the 101 Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment had the longest stay, from 1941 to 1942. There were plenty of air raid warnings, but attacks on the base were rare. According to the battery war diaries, the guns were fired only a few times each month, usually at reconnaissance planes. This coastal battery is situated at Rubha Nan Sasan, at the end of a track from Cove. The battery observation post, two gun-emplacements, two searchlight emplacements, engine rooms, magazine are all extant. In an area some 100m to the SW are many hut bases, which formed the accommodation camp for those serving at the battery. The battery was armed with 2 x 6-inch MkVII guns on Naval mountings from HMS Iron Duke, which were installed in July 1941. The battery was placed on care and maintenance in April 1945 and it has been suggested that the gun barrels from the mountings were rolled into the sea, but there is no evidence to support this. A memorial to the 3000 men who died on the Arctic convoys near the Cove Battery was unveiled on 10th September 1999 “IN MEMORY OF OUR SHIPMATES WHO SAILED FROM LOCH EWE DURING WORLD WAR II THEY LOST THEIR LIVES IN THE BITTER ARCTIC SEA BATTLES TO NORTH RUSSIA AND NEVER RETURNED TO THIS TRANQUIL ANCHORAGE. WE WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER THEM.” Ref: J Guy 2000; NMRS MS 810/10, Vol.1, 57, Vol.3, 28-31
1. Cove – Loch Ewe Wester Ross Scotland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Loch Ewe has a side many people are unaware of; this beautiful north-facing loch in Wester Ross was used as a convoy collecting point with a strong naval presence during WW11. Loch Ewe is a natural deep-water sea loch that links to the Atlantic Ocean via a relatively “narrow mouth” which made it easier to protect the loch from enemy submarines. There was one Heavy Anti-Aircraft Battery and one troop from a light Anti-Aircraft Battery stationed at Loch Ewe, about 12 officers and 380 men altogether. It was in February 1941, when the loch became a convoy collecting point, that its presence became permanent. 379 Battery of the 101 Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment had the longest stay, from 1941 to 1942. There were plenty of air raid warnings, but attacks on the base were rare. According to the battery war diaries, the guns were fired only a few times each month, usually at reconnaissance planes. This coastal battery is situated at Rubha Nan Sasan, at the end of a track from Cove. The battery observation post, two gun-emplacements, two searchlight emplacements, engine rooms, magazine are all extant. In an area some 100m to the SW are many hut bases, which formed the accommodation camp for those serving at the battery. The battery was armed with 2 x 6-inch MkVII guns on Naval mountings from HMS Iron Duke, which were installed in July 1941. The battery was placed on care and maintenance in April 1945 and it has been suggested that the gun barrels from the mountings were rolled into the sea, but there is no evidence to support this. A memorial to the 3000 men who died on the Arctic convoys near the Cove Battery was unveiled on 10th September 1999 “IN MEMORY OF OUR SHIPMATES WHO SAILED FROM LOCH EWE DURING WORLD WAR II THEY LOST THEIR LIVES IN THE BITTER ARCTIC SEA BATTLES TO NORTH RUSSIA AND NEVER RETURNED TO THIS TRANQUIL ANCHORAGE. WE WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER THEM.” Ref: J Guy 2000; NMRS MS 810/10, Vol.1, 57, Vol.3, 28-31
2. Cove – Loch Ewe Wester Ross Scotland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To View Click on Image
Loch Ewe has a side many people are unaware of; this beautiful north-facing loch in Wester Ross was used as a convoy collecting point with a strong naval presence during WW11. Loch Ewe is a natural deep-water sea loch that links to the Atlantic Ocean via a relatively “narrow mouth” which made it easier to protect the loch from enemy submarines. There was one Heavy Anti-Aircraft Battery and one troop from a light Anti-Aircraft Battery stationed at Loch Ewe, about 12 officers and 380 men altogether. It was in February 1941, when the loch became a convoy collecting point, that its presence became permanent. 379 Battery of the 101 Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment had the longest stay, from 1941 to 1942. There were plenty of air raid warnings, but attacks on the base were rare. According to the battery war diaries, the guns were fired only a few times each month, usually at reconnaissance planes. This coastal battery is situated at Rubha Nan Sasan, at the end of a track from Cove. The battery observation post, two gun-emplacements, two searchlight emplacements, engine rooms, magazine are all extant. In an area some 100m to the SW are many hut bases, which formed the accommodation camp for those serving at the battery. The battery was armed with 2 x 6-inch MkVII guns on Naval mountings from HMS Iron Duke, which were installed in July 1941. The battery was placed on care and maintenance in April 1945 and it has been suggested that the gun barrels from the mountings were rolled into the sea, but there is no evidence to support this. A memorial to the 3000 men who died on the Arctic convoys near the Cove Battery was unveiled on 10th September 1999 “IN MEMORY OF OUR SHIPMATES WHO SAILED FROM LOCH EWE DURING WORLD WAR II THEY LOST THEIR LIVES IN THE BITTER ARCTIC SEA BATTLES TO NORTH RUSSIA AND NEVER RETURNED TO THIS TRANQUIL ANCHORAGE. WE WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER THEM.” Ref: J Guy 2000; NMRS MS 810/10, Vol.1, 57, Vol.3, 28-31
3.Cove – Loch Ewe Wester Ross Scotland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To View Click on Image
Loch Ewe has a side many people are unaware of; this beautiful north-facing loch in Wester Ross was used as a convoy collecting point with a strong naval presence during WW11. Loch Ewe is a natural deep-water sea loch that links to the Atlantic Ocean via a relatively “narrow mouth” which made it easier to protect the loch from enemy submarines. There was one Heavy Anti-Aircraft Battery and one troop from a light Anti-Aircraft Battery stationed at Loch Ewe, about 12 officers and 380 men altogether. It was in February 1941, when the loch became a convoy collecting point, that its presence became permanent. 379 Battery of the 101 Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment had the longest stay, from 1941 to 1942. There were plenty of air raid warnings, but attacks on the base were rare. According to the battery war diaries, the guns were fired only a few times each month, usually at reconnaissance planes. This coastal battery is situated at Rubha Nan Sasan, at the end of a track from Cove. The battery observation post, two gun-emplacements, two searchlight emplacements, engine rooms, magazine are all extant. In an area some 100m to the SW are many hut bases, which formed the accommodation camp for those serving at the battery. The battery was armed with 2 x 6-inch MkVII guns on Naval mountings from HMS Iron Duke, which were installed in July 1941. The battery was placed on care and maintenance in April 1945 and it has been suggested that the gun barrels from the mountings were rolled into the sea, but there is no evidence to support this. A memorial to the 3000 men who died on the Arctic convoys near the Cove Battery was unveiled on 10th September 1999 “IN MEMORY OF OUR SHIPMATES WHO SAILED FROM LOCH EWE DURING WORLD WAR II THEY LOST THEIR LIVES IN THE BITTER ARCTIC SEA BATTLES TO NORTH RUSSIA AND NEVER RETURNED TO THIS TRANQUIL ANCHORAGE. WE WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER THEM.” Ref: J Guy 2000; NMRS MS 810/10, Vol.1, 57, Vol.3, 28-31
The Last Convoy  Cove – Loch Ewe Wester Ross Scotland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Built on a peninsula and with several of the runway approaches over cliffs, Dale opened in June 1942 as a satellite for the nearby RAF Talbenny. The frontline No 304 (Polish) Squadron immediately moved in and the squadron’s Vickers Wellington aircraft carried out missions including convoy protection, anti-submarine patrols and bombing raids in Occupied France. In April 1943 the Coastal Command Development Unit (CCDU) took control of the airfield. This unit carried out important work evaluating new equipment as well as teaching and developing new tactics. The unit therefore operated a very diverse range of aircraft types. September 1943 saw the airfield transfer from the RAF to the Royal Navy and Dale was used by various Royal Navy training units until its closure to flying in 1948. The Admiralty made several improvements to Dale such as a new concrete apron, the building of a new control tower, concrete huts and at least two naval Mainhill hangars to supplement the existing T2 and Blister hangars. Under Navy control, the airfield was known as HMS Goldcrest and a number of different units operated from the airfield. These included No 794 Squadron (also referred to as the Naval Air Firing Unit), carrying out target-towing duties, and a twin-engine conversion unit providing training for larger aircraft in the Fleet Air Arm such as Bristol Beaufighters. A Fighter Direction School and a Night Fighter School were also established at Dale and operated briefly in the last few years of the airfield’s active life. Also heavily associated with Dale was the ground station of Kete to the south. This was an Aircraft Direction Centre, carrying out radar training, which opened late in World War Two and co-operated with Dale, using it as its flying base. After World War Two there was naval equipment storage here under the control of a major depot at Milford Haven until the early 1960s. The dispersal points, hangars, workshops and accommodation blocks were to the northeast of the runways. The airfield is now primarily farmland, although the runways and hard standings are still visible. A number of the buildings still stand and a hut group is now listed. The Pembrokeshire Coast Path uses the southern and western sections of the perimeter track. Ref: http://www.abct.org.uk/airfields/airfield-finder/dale/
Former RAF Dale / HMS Goldcrest – Pembrokeshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Heavy A-A Barrage Balloon Base and Water Tower – Tournaig Wester Ross Scotland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Aulbea Village Hall, Wartime Cinema and Social Centre -Wester Ross Scotland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Commando Memorial stands some 17ft or 5.2m high, and comprises a group of three bronze Commandos dressed in typical World War Two uniforms and equipment including cap comforters, ammunition pouches and weapons. They are looking south towards Ben Nevis. A large inscription on the plinth just beneath their feet reads “United We Conquer”, while the plaque on the front of the plinth reads: “In memory of the officers and men of the Commandos who died in the Second World War 1939–1945. This country was their training ground.
Commando Memorial – Spean Bridge Fort William Scotland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Former Home of William Joyce – Coed-y-Bleiddiau Gwynedd Wales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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 With the arrival of World War II, Evanton airfield became HMS Fieldfare between 1937 and 1947. The airfield initially expanded to become a repair base, and a school for flight, bombing and armament training by September 1939, with bomb storage being added by 1940, together with additional buildings for accommodation, transport, servicing, repair and storage. The east-west runway is 1,248 yards long and the northeast-southwest is 1,002 yards long. The airfield was placed on care and maintenance August 26, 1944, and later saw some civil use after December 1947. Evanton Babe The largest aircraft to use Evanton was a USAAF B17, 42-31919, piloted by Robert C Schimmel. Navigator Charles J Mueller reported that upon their arrival in England, their scheduled airfield at Prestwick, had difficult weather conditions for landing, so they diverted to make their anding at an RAF airfield at Evanton Bay. The short runway was not designed for bombers, and both tires blew out due to the accelerated stop. While replacing the tyres, the RAF ground crew painted a lady on the nose of the aircraft and called her “Evanton Babe”. On March 6, 1944, while being piloted by Schimel, the B17 was damaged by fighters near Emmen, Germany. Reports note that the crew bailed out, and the pilot returned alone. Ref : http://secretscotland.org.uk/index.php/Secrets/EvantonAirfield?from=Secrets.HMSFieldfare
Former RAF Evanton Airfield – The Highlands Scotland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Local Defence Volunteers were organized nationally in May 1940 to supplement field troops and in November were incorporated in the army as the Home Guard. Enrolment became compulsory in March 1942 for all men from 17 to 65 in civil defence regions. They were fully equipped and served a maximum of 48 hours every 4 weeks. They received subsistence allowances while on duty but no pay. Their primary role was defence, to delay the enemy until regular formations moved to the attack. One of the more serious tasks of the Home Guard was to mount a twenty four hour watch at Ribblehead Viaduct on the main west coast railway. This was to prevent sabotage by the German Fifth Column and members from Malhamdale would take their turn on that duty.
Ribblehead Viaduct – North Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kilnsey Trout Farm – Mastiles Lane North Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1. Pillbox Cayton Bay – North Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In 1940 a network of defences was hastily built all over the British Isles to prevent an anticipated German invasion. The most common of these defences were called pillboxes, squat concrete forts that were sited at road junctions, canals and other strategic points. With the passage of time it is estimated that less than 6,000 of a total of 28,000 pillboxes built still survive. They remain as permanent monuments and a silent tribute to the courage and tenacity of the British people during the dark days of 1940 when Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany. http://www.pillboxesuk.co.uk
2. Pillbox Cayton Bay – North Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In 1940 a network of defences was hastily built all over the British Isles to prevent an anticipated German invasion. The most common of these defences were called pillboxes, squat concrete forts that were sited at road junctions, canals and other strategic points. With the passage of time it is estimated that less than 6,000 of a total of 28,000 pillboxes built still survive. They remain as permanent monuments and a silent tribute to the courage and tenacity of the British people during the dark days of 1940 when Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany. http://www.pillboxesuk.co.uk
3. Pillboxes Cayton Bay – North Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1. Lossie Forest Anti Tank Defence
1. Lossie Forest Anti Tank Defence – Moray Scotland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2. Lossie Forest Anti Tank Defence – Moray Scotland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Graffiti – Chemical Weapons Plant

 

 

 

 

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Switch – Chemical Weapons Plant – Rhydymwyn North Wales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Former RAF Wombleton Airfield Control Tower

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mulberry Harbour Construction Site – Morfa, Conwy North Wales